Texas Mutual Workers' Compensation Insurance Company - Work Safe, Texas

Acclimatization Key to Protecting Workers from Heat-Related Illness

Most Texans know the basics of summer safety. We can rattle them off as easily as our shoe size, our birthday and, hopefully, our wedding anniversary. Still, it’s easy to get complacent the longer sweltering temperatures hang around. And complacency can lead to serious heat-related illness.

If your employees work outside or in hot indoor environments, take a few minutes to promote these safety tips:

Employers: Allow workers to acclimatize

The Occupational Safety and Health Administration recently investigated 20 cases of heat-related illnesses that happened between 2012 and 2013. In 13 of the cases, the worker did not survive. Most of the fatalities happened during the first three days on the job.

OSHA’s investigation underscores the importance of allowing workers to acclimatize to the heat. Simply put, give workers time to adjust to the stress of working in hot temperatures. Acclimatization is especially important for people who are new to outdoor work, returning from more than one week off, and for all workers on the first day of a sudden heat wave.

During acclimatization, physical changes in blood vessels and sweating help the body spread heat more effectively. The process can take up to three weeks, but the first five days are the most critical.

Begin by exposing employees to 50 percent of the normal workload and time spent in the hot environment. Then, gradually build up to 100 percent by the fifth day.

Get free resources

Summer Safety Tips
Short article written by a Texas Mutual safety professional

Water. Rest. Shade.
OSHA’s annual heat safety campaign

Occupational Heat Exposure
Tips for protecting indoor workers from heat-related illnesses

Heat Safety App
Allows users to calculate the heat index, evaluate the risk and access preventive measures

Heat Stress Fact Sheet
Short training tool that includes a quiz
Download it in English or Spanish.

During acclimatization, physical changes in blood vessels and sweating help the body spread heat more effectively.