Texas Mutual Workers' Compensation Insurance Company - Work Safe, Texas

6 Things
You Need to Know about OSHA’s Form 300A

Certain events are synonymous with the change in seasons. For example, the annual South by Southwest Festival has ushered in spring in Austin for nearly three decades. And nothing hints to the end of the long, hot Texas summer like Labor Day.

Ask a workplace safety professional the first thing that comes to mind this time of year, and it will likely be OSHA Form 300A, Summary of Work-Related Injuries and Illnesses. The form includes important obligations for employers. Here are six things you need to know:

  1. Timeliness matters. You must post OSHA Form 300A, Summary of Work-Related Injuries and Illnesses, by February 1 and leave it posted until April 30 of every year, even if you had no recordable injuries or illnesses.
  2. Location matters. You have to post the form in each office location, in a conspicuous place or places where notices to employees are customarily posted.
  3. The form doesn’t give details. You will not include injured employees’ names or any other information that might identify them. OSHA Form 300A provides a general overview of your recordable injuries and illnesses.
  4. It’s one of a series of forms. There are three forms in the OSHA injury reporting and recordkeeping series. Forms 300 and 301 are designed to give OSHA a clear picture of each recordable injury and illness. Form 300A is a summary of your recordable injuries and illness for the year.
  5. Injury recording and injury recordkeeping are completely separate. Form 300A explains which types of injuries are recordable.
  6. You can use your own forms instead of the OSHA 300 forms. If you do, however, they have to be equivalent to the OSHA forms. An equivalent form is one that has the same information, is as readable and understandable, and is completed using the same instructions as the OSHA form it replaces.

For more information about injury recordkeeping, click here.

For more information about injury reporting, click here.

Important revisions took effect Jan. 1

Revisions to OSHA’s injury reporting and recordkeeping rule went into effect Jan. 1, 2015. The revisions expanded the list of injuries employers must report to OSHA and changed the list of industries that are partially exempt from keeping injury records. Texas Mutual invites you to review its recent policyholder webinar and learn your obligations under the revised rule.

Ask a workplace safety professional the first thing that comes to mind this time of year, and it will likely be OSHA Form 300A.